Farewell InQuire and thank you!

1505621_10206611307870372_5659322256488470657_nDear InQuirers,

This is it guys. Prepare yourselves from some sentimental InQuire loving; I’ve got a lot of emotions to force upon you.

For the last three years, InQuire has been a huge, nay, gigantic, part of my life and today, it all comes to an end. Today, I hand over my role as Website Editor and try so hard not to (not that hard) weep uncontrollably as I hand over my baby, InQuire Live.

Student journalism has been the best part of my university experience and I implore anyone to get involved. You don’t have to be the world’s best writer (are you reading this mushiness?), or the most confident person in the world, you just have to be a team player. From the weekly committee meetings to the writers’ meetings and from laying the newspaper to the mammoth proofreading sessions, it’s hard work, but we do it as a team and we are insanely proud of what we produce. We’re just a team of students who volunteer and work, because we enjoy it.

You may have noticed, or heard me banging on about, a few slight changes to the website this year and I’mIMG_4953 immensely proud of the website you are looking at right now. It was my main aim when I started the year, to see the website get redesigned and we did it! It’s not perfect, but it’s pretty damn amazing, so here’s a personal thank you to you, Sophia Ppali for your website designing wizardry.

To the InQuire editors: I know I probably get on your nerves nit picking about everything, but it’s only because I want the best! I couldn’t appreciate everything you do more. I can’t say I relish proofreading absolutely every word that gets published online or in print, but without you, there would be no website or newspaper. Thank you, thank you, thank you for sticking by myself, Emma and Nat. Speaking of, you are the two best execs I could have asked to work with and you’ve become amazing friends. My oh my, this is soppy. Apologies.

1610905_10206611307190355_8507581700506066865_n (1)And to you, the writers and readers: If you didn’t write for us or read what we published, what would be the point? There has been some amazing writing this year; whether it entertained us, informed us or shocked us, we have been proud to publish what you wrote.  Thank you for your hard work and please keep writing and reading.

Good luck to next year’s team and look after InQuire for us. I hope you have as much fun as we’ve all had this year.

We’re an odd bunch, but I think we’re pretty awesome. Farewell guys, it’s been great.

 

Lots of love from,

(For the last time) Your Website Editor

P.S If anyone needs me, I’ll be sobbing in the corner of the Student Media Centre for the next few weeks.

Coffee Shop Cosiness

Photo by Alaric King

Photo by Alaric King

I felt inspired to write today, for the first time in ages and it got me thinking. Uni life, especially third year, and especially two weeks before the end of term can be beyond stressful. I don’t think I’ve slept properly in weeks, my head is all over the place and I feel like I’m ambling aimlessly through one day to the next. I feel on edge all the time and I hate it. So that’s why everyone needs to find that one place where you feel comfortable and relaxed. It’s important to get away from the stress and just give yourself a break. And no, I don’t mean the silent area of the library. I mean somewhere so detached from uni that you can escape the campus bubble and remember what it felt like to live without deadlines. Here’s what happened when I found mine:

Today, I found my own little slice of heaven. And it was glorious.

Having bravely ventured into the center of Canterbury on the first Saturday of December, I felt overwhelmed, suffocated and incredibly claustrophobic. I needed to get out of there. So I walked, and I kept walking until I found my new home.

A quaint, hidden away, cosy coffee shop. It was peaceful and secluded and cut off from the Christmas crazed shoppers outside. With a coffee and my writing journal, I sat back and just wrote.

For the first time in months, I didn’t feel stressed. I actually felt happy.

It’s one small room laid out like someone’s living room (with a till and a coffee machine in the middle), with snug sofas and dining tables where we all huddled round and wondered if we were sat next to the next great author. Who knows. But it felt like an exclusive little club of people, all content that they had found this small haven in among Canterbury’s mishmash of shops and cobbled streets.

I love this small, homely city, but now I really truly love it. Now I have found somewhere that I can relax and look forward to visiting.

Today, I sat among writers and workers, busily scribbling thoughts and ideas into their journals. It made me smile and there seemed to be some kind of unspoken pleasantness and understanding between us all. A brief warm smile or a small nod of the head as if to say, “I understand. This is my heaven too.” As bizarre and cliched as it sounds, I felt like I’d finally found people like me, who shared the same thoughts and understood why I was there but without needing to question me. They left me to it and let me write away to my heart’s content.

Now there’s no way I’m giving you the name or location of this haven because it’s all mine and I feel I can be selfish about it and not share it. But I suggest you go and find your slice of heaven, hold on to it and never let it go.

Now back to reality, and that dreaded library. Deadlines await!